Here's why not all grass fed beef is equal

Our beautiful cows on our Maine grass pasture

I haven’t been raising grass fed beef cattle my whole life. And that’s a good thing. 

I don’t have a lot of bad habits. And I don’t have a "we’ve always done it that way" approach.

I’m going to be honest - and maybe hurt some feelings with what I’m about to say. The "we’ve always done it that way" approach is mostly wrong. 

Our goal at Heartstone Farm is to produce exceptional quality grass fed beef. That means it’s flavorful with a beefy taste (not gamey). That means it’s tender. And that means it’s nutritious. We simply won’t sell beef that doesn’t meet our standards. 

But most grass fed beef that’s being raised here in New England is not tender or flavorful. 

The problem is that doing it "right" is a lot of work. Doing it right means your cattle will need to be moved at least once a day to new pasture. Doing it right means the cattle need to be gaining at least two pounds a day - and they need to be weighed every 30 days to insure that’s happening. Doing it right means never stressing the cows - ever. Doing it right means the cows need mineral access at all times. 

We’re doing all of those things. It’s a lot of work. It means long days. And it means our prices are typically higher because we’ve got more labor and time invested in our cattle.

But I think it’s worth it - and so do our customers. 

Our meat is flavorful and tender (our customers agree - read their reviews). There's a beefy flavor - the way beef used to taste.

This year we’re expanding our herd - not by much. But it will allow us to have our gourmet grass fed beef available to more folks. 

I hope you’ll join our Heartstone Farm customer family. 

If you’d be interested in information on our Quarters, Sides and Wholes - please click hereand we’ll let you know our prices and availability ASAP. (Our first shares will be available in April this year.)

Interested in finding out about our Cow Shares? - CLICK HERE

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